Dino loves to eat!

Big roars to you all,

We hope you enjoyed last weeks challenge! Did you find out where your food is grown?

Different countries grow different foods depending on their climate.

For example, you can’t grow bananas or pineapples in the fields in England because those fruits need a lot of sunshine and the English summer is not hot enough!

On our trip, we have seen lots of food being grown. Lots of people in the world grow just enough food for them and their family to eat. They are called ‘kitchen gardens’ as they cook and eat everything that they grow. Could you grow some herbs or vegetables on your window sill?

Some people sell any spare fruit or vegetables to get extra money for their families. They have little stalls at the side of the road. Can you see the fruit?

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Some people sell their fruit to passing buses….when the bus stops they don’t have much time so they hold the bananas up and people pay through the bus window…

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Big farms grow food for shops and supermarkets or to sell to other countries. Big farms send their food in lorries, ships and aeroplanes.

When you looked at your food in your cupboard, Where did your fruit and vegetables come from?

We have seen lots of fruit growing. Would you like to see some?

In Ethiopia and Uganda, there were some avocados growing:

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In Uganda, Some papaya:

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Here is sugar cane growing:

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And this is a jak fruit….it was huge!

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In Kenya we saw two popular foods growing. Tea and coffee!

Tea is grown in the hilly parts of Kenya where it is hot but also has more rain! We cycled through fields and fields of tea plants. It made us very thirsty!

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Tea is grown on huge farms called plantations. Can you see the rows and rows of bushes! They covered whole hillsides.

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To make the freshest tea, you have to pick the bud and just 2 leaves. The rest of the plant cannot be used as the leaves are too old and do not taste very good. We had a try at picking tea. We were very slow. You cannot use machines to pick tea so people have to do it. Tea pickers are very quick and can pick 50kg of tea a day! Wow! That’s a lot of tea leaves.

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When the leaves have all been picked…the tea pickers move to the next field and only return once the new tea leaves have regrown!

These bushes are 50 years old! When the bush gets old the leaves are not as tasty….so every 10 years they are cut right back with huge saws. This is called pruning and it makes the bush regrow all it’s leaves…making very tasty tea once again! It is like the tea plant getting a giant haircut!
Lion remembered his last haircut!

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The plantations each have a factory next to them so that the tea leaves can be made into teabags straight away to keep the taste fresh.

The tea is then dried, chopped and fermented. It is then either kept as tea leaves or made into tea bags. These are then put in boxes and sent by ship or aeroplane to the supermarkets.

We saw a plantation owned by Unilever…they make Lipton tea! Lion was so excited to see the tea leaves in Kenya being turned into tea bags that are sold in shops in London and England!

Coffee: in Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi we have seen coffee growing!
Coffee needs the right temperature to grow so only grows in these parts of the world:

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Coffee is made from coffee beans which are found growing on trees. The beans are hidden inside coffee berries.

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When the berries are ripe, they are picked by villagers.

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They are then dried on long tables outside.

The seeds are then roasted at high temperatures, sometimes as high as 200 degrees centigrade! Scorching!

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They are then ground into coffee powder and brewed to make your cup of coffee!

Next time you go shopping…see if you can find some tea or coffee that was grown in Kenya!

Big roars

Dino and Lion

Xx

Follow us on twitter @Dinoandlion
Or send us a question at Dinoandlion@gmail.com

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